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Gadgette
21-02-2010, 05:26 PM
What's the most unsuitable piece of kit or clothing you've seen a YP turn up with for an activity/camp?

Today, ASL, GSL and me plus two Scouts did a full walkthrough of the night hike we're doing on Tuesday evening. Now what I tell you next is despite this Scout knowing better and against all advice, he turns up late with white (yes, white) joggers and wait for it, white trainers :rolleyes: Needless to say, following heavy rain and having crossed several fields, white items had turned a rather fetching shade of brown! No accidents thank goodness but i've sent a reminder to the other Scouts to make it strict "No Trainers" on Tuesday.

banderlog
21-02-2010, 05:34 PM
Abseiling one Cub Scout turned up with swimming things.

ph_zone
21-02-2010, 05:39 PM
I did one hike with some guides that decided the latest designer trainers would be fine..
she was most upset when walking through the mud because she left her trainer in the middle !.

marcush
21-02-2010, 05:42 PM
I've seen people do climbing in sandals and some girl who thaught she'd wear hotpants.

Bushfella
21-02-2010, 06:05 PM
A 10 inch screen portable TV on a 2 day hike!

Kaawaterloo
21-02-2010, 06:59 PM
Back in the day I had my Sixer turn up for camp with a shell suit (yes I'm that old), and even now as a Cub Leader you get Cubs with coats made of the same type of material. I tell them time and time again - we will be using fire, don't bring stuff that could catch light and stick to your skin.

The worst offender though without a doubt is the bin liner in place of a stuff sack. I mean, how much does a stuff sack cost ? Fill it with your towel and it's a pillow, there's always one....

marcush
21-02-2010, 07:08 PM
does anyone know why people think crocs are good shoes to bring on a camp? I absolutely hate them.

DonTregartha
21-02-2010, 07:11 PM
School back pack for a two day hike. Everything was hanging off on bits of string and the swaying side to side of everything wore the kid out. Luckily we didn't have rain.

As BSL we did a night hike over muddy fields one winter's evening. One parent dropped his daughter off in her 'warm coat' - a pale pink suede coat with furry lining. His missus gave him hell after the pick up.

Raksha
21-02-2010, 07:26 PM
does anyone know why people think crocs are good shoes to bring on a camp? I absolutely hate them.I have taken crocs to camp before. I found them invaluable. I used them as shoes to walk around the site in, and as the site was on sandy soil it was easy to wash them out or brush the soil out before going into my tent, they were also great on the beach and on the water line. I also found them very light to wear on my feet. I hasten to add, I also took my walking boots, trainers and black uniform shoes as well!

Gadgette
21-02-2010, 07:48 PM
A lighter hidden down the back of an older Scouts pants. And no, it wasn't me that found it but when caught lighting it in a tent, it transpired his mum knew he had hidden it and where :rolleyes:

also last year one of the Scouts brought a lightweight cotton caravanning sleeping bag - really bulky and in the dreaded black bag. good thing it was a mild night and used it inside a survival bag.

Lynn-Cubs
21-02-2010, 08:00 PM
Back in the day I had my Sixer turn up for camp with a shell suit (yes I'm that old), and even now as a Cub Leader you get Cubs with coats made of the same type of material. I tell them time and time again - we will be using fire, don't bring stuff that could catch light and stick to your skin.

The worst offender though without a doubt is the bin liner in place of a stuff sack. I mean, how much does a stuff sack cost ? Fill it with your towel and it's a pillow, there's always one....

Sorry to go off topic, where can I buy a stuff sack from please? I got a sleeping bag from freecycle last year but without a stuff sack, I thought I'd make one but if I can buy one I bet it will last much longer and pack smaller.

Back on topic. I love the amount of toiletries people can bring for a weekend in a tent. A little sweat is not going to kill them!

aldamaster
21-02-2010, 08:15 PM
Sorry to go off topic, where can I buy a stuff sack from please? I got a sleeping bag from freecycle last year but without a stuff sack, I thought I'd make one but if I can buy one I bet it will last much longer and pack smaller.

Back on topic. I love the amount of toiletries people can bring for a weekend in a tent. A little sweat is not going to kill them!


Most of the camping shops, i like Go outdoors (alot cheaper if you buy the card!), or decathalon or blacks, any outdoors/camping shop really.

Lynn-Cubs
21-02-2010, 08:24 PM
Great, thanks. Never thought to look.

Doug in Canada
21-02-2010, 08:51 PM
I've had parents send their kids with slumber bags (sold for sleeping in front of the TV in your home!) on summer camp in the mountains where temps can get down to the single digits.

Nick
21-02-2010, 09:03 PM
At Gilwell Winter Camp 2009 (very cold down to -9C at times) I had one Explorer (my son!) turn up in shorts. He did put long trousers on after he realized that icelcles were forming on his leg hairs!

Nick

Evil Akela
21-02-2010, 09:30 PM
Back on topic. I love the amount of toiletries people can bring for a weekend in a tent. A little sweat is not going to kill them!

You mean they are meant to bring wash things? They are the first things to be taken out if the bag is getting tight!

tdjno
21-02-2010, 09:31 PM
On the last summer camp, we did have a scout who decided that this was the correct manner to pack his bags!

http://2ndgoringandstreatley.org.uk/cpg1412/albums/userpics/10001/normal_P1010217.jpg

Richard T
21-02-2010, 09:42 PM
On the last summer camp, we did have a scout who decided that this was the correct manner to pack his bags!

http://2ndgoringandstreatley.org.uk/cpg1412/albums/userpics/10001/normal_P1010217.jpg

At least its not being dragged along the ground in black bin bags where the bin bag develops a hole and leaves a trail of its ( former) contents behind.

As for unsuitable kit, I've seen one group who had a Playstation on the table in their main mess tent, as one of their Scouts thought he could plug it into a TV.

sjl14
21-02-2010, 09:44 PM
Back when I was a scout we had one young scout turn up to a 40 mile sponsored cycle with his pack lunch and waterproof jacket in a carrier bag hanging of his handlebars.

DonTregartha
21-02-2010, 10:23 PM
On the last summer camp, we did have a scout who decided that this was the correct manner to pack his bags!


tdjino, I think its a bit rich asking them to pack a flagpole as well!!

Jamez1
21-02-2010, 10:40 PM
Haha. We were just getting ready to set off on a hike in winter, kit he was wearing was mostly ok however on querying where his gloves were, he opened his bag to reveal an empty flask (like a 1.5 litre), a load of felt tip pens and a DVD from the sun. :P

gerbil
21-02-2010, 10:49 PM
At Gilwell Winter Camp 2009 (very cold down to -9C at times) I had one Explorer (my son!) turn up in shorts. He did put long trousers on after he realized that icelcles were forming on his leg hairs!

Nick

I wasn't sure where this post was going but i'm glad it was leg hairs!

Alfbranch
22-02-2010, 09:16 PM
Back when I was a scout we had one young scout turn up to a 40 mile sponsored cycle with his pack lunch and waterproof jacket in a carrier bag hanging of his handlebars.
I (as ascout) turned up for a 40 mile sponsored ride on a 24"wheeled single speed bike, boy was that a hard day:rolleyes:
Not sure I had a packed lunch though and did not have a waterproof mind suntan lotion and a hat would have been nice.

We had a scout turn up with a sleeping bag that just reached his waist and he was only 10.

Downesie
22-02-2010, 09:43 PM
...a 40 mile sponsored ride on a 24"wheeled single speed bike, boy was that a hard day:rolleyes:

A single speed bike in west Cumbria! I hope it had a freewheel so you got a rest downhill;)

Are all these Scouting bin bags the ones which are now wrapped around barbed wire fences near farms? The farmers get the blame but I'm not so sure.

tim_n
24-02-2010, 11:44 AM
Last weekend our oldest scout turned up with a single pair of shoes which were becoming 'lippy' (ie falling to pieces)

After two relatively short walks (can't even really call them hikes!) lasting no more than an hour which included puddles the entire sole on one delaminated. This was temporarily fixed with gaffa tape (no duct tape!) but by the end of the weekend had fallen entirely to bits.

Nevermind!

Gadgette
24-02-2010, 04:48 PM
well after my opening post about unsuitable kit, delighted to say all the Scouts turned up suitably booted and waterproofed last night (relief)! We had a great hike, lots of mud and the rain held off for the duration, finished at the chippy. 4 new Scouts were invested on top of a Mount (like a huge molehill w/o the hole about 4/5 metres high) with us leaders at the bottom. It was pretty special as mist shrouded the Scouts standing at the top. Fab

Anyway, a couple of my posts that got wiped in the backup were:

Scout sent on a survival weekend wearing hike boots too small when he had ingrown toenails (ouch) and a lighter hidden down the back of a Scout's pants. His mum admitted where he'd hidden it when it got later confiscated when found to be "playing" with it in a tent.

julian
24-02-2010, 06:45 PM
Was about to set 5 scouts off on their 15 mile hike when i thought a spot check would probably be a good idea...
Scout X had about 6lb of sweets, a ball of hairy string, an antler, a coconut... these were at the expense of the tent inner he was meant to carry and the sleeping bag???

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The Following Was Added to the post within 60 minutes of posting the above
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OOOOhhhhh i just remembered this one... and at the risk of sounding a bit sexist.... a friend brought his new female friend on camp... we camped in vango force tens for the night and in the morning, she didn't emerge from the tent until she'd got all of her makeup on....

the looks on the other leaders faces was priceless... deer in headlights!

Tango'd... but noone was brave enough to tell her!

loonytoon
24-02-2010, 11:05 PM
Scout X had about 6lb of sweets, a ball of hairy string, an antler, a coconut...


Ok, the sweets and string I can understand, but an antler and coconut? WHY! :smash:

Raksha
25-02-2010, 11:06 AM
Ok, the sweets and string I can understand, but an antler and coconut? WHY! :smash:
perhaps he wanted to play hockey?

Andrew
25-02-2010, 11:41 AM
I wasn't going to add to the list of examples on here but I've just had a text from a parent about our hike/camp tomorrow night. The kit list asks for walking boots and the the parent asks ...

"Are wellies an option?"

Mind you the best we've had, was a few years ago on a summer camp, where we left the site to go canoeing. The PL brought a towel to dry himself off but forgot a change of clothes. He didn't tell us after he'd capsized!!

DonTregartha
25-02-2010, 02:13 PM
The kit list asks for walking boots and the the parent asks ...
"Are wellies an option?"


:mad::smash::mad::smash::mad::smash::mad::smash:

CilDroichid
25-02-2010, 02:25 PM
she didn't emerge from the tent until she'd got all of her makeup onI had a similar experience many years ago - had to travel direct to camp from a business trip on the Friday - all my gear was in the car; but I got the most desperate ribbing for turning up to the site in business suit, stockings, heels etc.

So just for pig iron, I made sure to put on full make up every morning of that camp! :-)

Goose
25-02-2010, 03:02 PM
I had a similar experience many years ago - had to travel direct to camp from a business trip on the Friday - all my gear was in the car; but I got the most desperate ribbing for turning up to the site in business suit, stockings, heels etc.

So just for pig iron, I made sure to put on full make up every morning of that camp! :-)

I don't know the reasoning before but i always thought you were a man
And as an explorer leader, most of mine come up knowin what/what not to bring

JeanieJ
25-02-2010, 03:04 PM
I don't know the reasoning before but i always thought you were a man


So did I and I don't know why I thought that either! :o

CilDroichid
25-02-2010, 03:47 PM
Not sure whether to be pleased at being gender-neutral in my posts or horribly embarrassed at being mistaken for a man! :o

Goose
25-02-2010, 04:14 PM
Not sure whether to be pleased at being gender-neutral in my posts or horribly embarrassed at being mistaken for a man! :o

i definatly meant it as a compliment :tong: and cheers jeanie, i wasn't the only one

aldamaster
25-02-2010, 05:04 PM
It is strange, that has happened with a couple of people on here, i some how (maybe becuase of the username?) decide they are male or female and then they say something which reveals it and i am like oh didn't realise that!!

joannacparker
25-02-2010, 06:49 PM
Instead of a rucksack for a hike the kid had a duffel bag, he walked with straps on his shoulders.

And I'm heared that an explorer is famous for her hiking in Converse shoes... i'd love to see how she copes with mountain walking soon!

sjl14
26-02-2010, 03:35 AM
It is strange, that has happened with a couple of people on here, i some how (maybe becuase of the username?) decide they are male or female and then they say something which reveals it and i am like oh didn't realise that!!

I've done that too. It's especially difficult when on mobile so you don't see photo's or signatures.

DonTregartha
26-02-2010, 07:19 AM
Not sure whether to be pleased at being gender-neutral in my posts or horribly embarrassed at being mistaken for a man! :o

Yup pretty gender neutral, but I had you down as one of the girls.

hoggie
26-02-2010, 07:28 AM
goalkeeper gloves for skiing and football boots for camp are my ones. Funnily enough they were both from the same boy!!

Chris Lambert
26-02-2010, 09:20 AM
I wasn't going to add to the list of examples on here but I've just had a text from a parent about our hike/camp tomorrow night. The kit list asks for walking boots and the the parent asks ...

"Are wellies an option?"

Is that not a reasonable question from someone who doesn't know?

big chris
26-02-2010, 09:32 AM
Is that not a reasonable question from someone who doesn't know?

very... equally reasonable from somebody who does know but isn't sure of quite what the activity is. a 3 mile walk through loads of mud? wellies would be ok and possibly ideal. (and would save the parent 40 quid in a lean post-christmas month.)

ASLChris
26-02-2010, 09:37 AM
Is that not a reasonable question from someone who doesn't know?

It seems like a sensible question to me. And better than the YP just showing up in wellies!

CHRI5
26-02-2010, 11:45 AM
Not sure whether to be pleased at being gender-neutral in my posts or horribly embarrassed at being mistaken for a man! :o

I was making the same mistake too, perhaps if you posted a picture of you on camp wearing what you turned up in, and we can judge for ourselves. :bigsmiley

TRH
26-02-2010, 11:53 AM
I was making the same mistake too, perhaps if you posted a picture of you on camp wearing what you turned up in, and we can judge for ourselves. :bigsmiley

Likewise, i don't know why, thought you were a male, I suppose it just shows our ignorance of Irish Names probably.

DuncanHill
26-02-2010, 12:16 PM
And I'm heared that an explorer is famous for her hiking in Converse shoes... i'd love to see how she copes with mountain walking soon!

Grrrr - don't get me started on Converse shoes, pet hate of mine, especially when the Scout in question, with sopping wet, sore feet, insists that they are waterproof and give good support!

Pete Sword
26-02-2010, 02:27 PM
We had some of our girls turn up to camp with curling/straightening tongs.! Also enough make up to stock Boots the chemist. Don't know where they expected to plug in the tongs.
And all this they expected to take on expedition! One of our senior female leaders impounded it, on the grounds of unnecessary weight, and stupidity.
The only trouble was that for the next few days, a lot of our younger leaders and instructors, male as well as female, were all sporting brightly coloured finger and toe nails!
Sometimes I really worry about them!

JeanieJ
26-02-2010, 02:43 PM
It's not just the girls! My 19 year old ASL and one of the 12 year old APL's (both male) had a 'high 5' moment last night when they both turned up with beautifully straightened and styled hair!
I've also found a picture of my ASL's sister at camp a couple of years ago (aged 14) in her camp blanket and fluffy slippers and sucking a dummy...... I was too embarrassed for her to post the pic!! :smash:

binky-beaver
26-02-2010, 04:56 PM
it doesnt help when schools tell you not to send the propper kit.
When my daughter went to a activity trip with the school we were told to pack wellys. I told them she didnt have any so I would be packing walking boots. They insisted she had to have wellys as they were walking in a stream as well as a very small walk over land. They didnt care that she also had watersport shoes, it had to be wellys or she wouldnt be able to join in.
I gave up and got wellys which she has never worn again.

binky

Doug in Canada
26-02-2010, 05:04 PM
How about proper kit in improper condition?

At our winter camp four years ago, an all section camp with Beavers arriving on Saturday morning and leaving on Sunday morning. The beavers stay inside a heated lodge and arrive sporadically over about a 30 minute period. This one parent dumps her five year old son and equipment at the door, says hi to the leaders and then leaves. We tell the youth to take off his winter boots and carry his gear over to the bunk area. He's about halfway there when we notice he is leaving very wet footprints! Turns out his winter boots were sopping wet and he tells us they got wet when they were playing in the snow after school the day before!! I don't know how this parent expected her kid to keep his feet warm in boots that were already wet before we even started playing outside in below zero weather!!

Gadgette
26-02-2010, 05:39 PM
very... equally reasonable from somebody who does know but isn't sure of quite what the activity is. a 3 mile walk through loads of mud? wellies would be ok and possibly ideal. (and would save the parent 40 quid in a lean post-christmas month.)

couldn't agree more Chris.

We did a 2 hour hike (aka stroll through the woods and surrounding roads) Tuesday night, LOADS of sloppy mud as it had been raining most of the day. Now having already walked the route on the previous Sunday, I was perfectly happy that Scouts wear wellies or hike boots as long as it wasn't trainers. In this instance nothing wrong at all with wellies and they did a grand job of keeping feet dry. Perfectly fine.

Of course, if we're talking a 10+ mile hike over varying terrain that's a different story, hike boots essential. But a leisurely stroll on an evening out, no way would I expect parents to fork out for hike boots if they didn't already have them.

I think its perfectly sensible for a parent to ask if Wellies are suitable. The leader concerned will know the route planned and know the terrain. They are called Wellington Boots after all! They are intended for walking in!

Some of the posts on here make it sound like Wellies are evil ;)

CilDroichid
26-02-2010, 06:06 PM
posted a picture of you on camp wearing what you turned up inNever one to pass up a challenge! :) Not sure how to insert a photo in post though?

Downesie
26-02-2010, 09:57 PM
...

I think its perfectly sensible for a parent to ask if Wellies are suitable...

...Some of the posts on here make it sound like Wellies are evil ;)

I think the other posts relate to occasions when the leader has assessed the route and deliberately put "hiking boots" and not "hiking boots or wellies".

Wellies are good. For short wet walks, for paddling and some other activities. But they are awful for a great many other activities - they rarely fit well, if you wear them for long your feet get cold (made worse by the fact that wellies have a sock magnet at the toe which gradually drags socks off feet).

If you want wellies which can be used in place of hiking boots, then you need to spend £40-£80 for some Muck Boots (or similar) - and if parents are going to do this they would be better with bog-standard cheap wellies and some half decent waterproof hiking boots.

dj_mikey_k
27-02-2010, 07:50 AM
We had some of our girls turn up to camp with curling/straightening tongs!

My MALE ASL has gas straighterners for when we are on camp :smash::smash:

Pete Sword
28-02-2010, 06:11 PM
Must be a generation thing, me getting to be an old g*t.
Having said that, one of our first Royal Navy inspections at camp we acquired some old solid flat irons, so that we could iron all our neckerchieves in readiness. I remembered you used to be able to buy 'camp' irons that worked on Ronsons lighter gas, searched everywhere but couldn't get hold of one.
We still have one of the solid irons, it makes a great door stop!

DuncanHill
28-02-2010, 06:18 PM
Wellies are good. For short wet walks, for paddling and some other activities. But they are awful for a great many other activities - they rarely fit well, if you wear them for long your feet get cold (made worse by the fact that wellies have a sock magnet at the toe which gradually drags socks off feet).



The trick with wellies is that one pair of socks is fitted into the wellies and rolled down over the top, the other pair stays on your feet. While you walk, one pair stays in place on your feet, the other stays in place in the wellies, and you can take your feet out of the boots and the wellie-socks stay in the wellies. Use proper woollen sea-boot socks for preference.

CilDroichid
28-02-2010, 11:20 PM
Right, hope this works! This is CilDroichid in business dress! :-)

David
28-02-2010, 11:42 PM
seems it didnt work...?

Howslo
01-03-2010, 04:13 PM
My MALE ASL has gas straighterners for when we are on camp :smash::smash:

Oh no! I bet he moisturises too...:rolleyes:

CilDroichid
01-03-2010, 10:24 PM
Ah rats! I put an image into my profile - how come its not showing up?

Andrew
02-03-2010, 12:03 PM
Is that not a reasonable question from someone who doesn't know?

I take your point but in this case the Camp concerned was our annual PL/APL training weekend. We hiked to the camp site, which we use regularly, along an already known route.

So both the Scout and the Parent should have known better. The Scout concerned turned up with walking boots by the way.

Doug in Canada
02-03-2010, 02:27 PM
Ah rats! I put an image into my profile - how come its not showing up?
You have to set the picture as your avatar, not as profile picture.

CilDroichid
02-03-2010, 03:30 PM
Done! - many thanks! :-)

glynh
02-03-2010, 05:19 PM
we were very recently in poland for a long weekend, it snowed the whole time and the temp was -2 for most days. we had a webcam of krakow on our website so everyone could see how it was before we went, we also had the weather report displayed and as usual gave everyone a kit list. Comfortable walking boots, somehow got converted to deck shoes / plimsolls. The said child also had no gloves or decent coat...............
Apparently his dad is a survival expert, you could not make it up.

big chris
02-03-2010, 08:48 PM
Apparently his dad is a survival expert, you could not make it up.

i know that sort of dad... all the gear, no idea. (such a fab expression)

DonTregartha
02-03-2010, 08:57 PM
footwear, gloves decent coat.

The number of times you could just get up and get out of the hut, if the blighters turned up in something sensible.

I used to bang on about this and even dragged kids out in their shirt sleeves in the rain.

Still they turn out in the heavy snowfall, jumping out of the warm car in scout shirt and trainers.

Do parents not understand we do outdoors?


All the gear and no idea... that sums up my view of Blacks/Millets
I know some here work/worked for them but there is an organisation which COULD have been a source of great useful kit for scouts etc, but ended up being a low end supplier of junk gear for babies and expensive, branded stuff for the adults who want to dress up like the outdoor expert.

Maybe that's why it went a bit wrong for them.

Lynn-Cubs
02-03-2010, 09:50 PM
footwear, gloves decent coat.

Ha, I didn't even see that on the school run when we had -15, thin jackets, trainers and not a hat in sight. I guess it's just easier to stay inside and turn up the heating.

Downesie
02-03-2010, 09:54 PM
...branded stuff for the adults who want to dress up like the outdoor expert...

You see people like this in Keswick and Ambleside. They get dressed up to walk around the outdoor shops - they stand our more than normal when it has been throwing it down (yep, most of the time here:rolleyes:) and they have no mud on their boots.

What is really annoying it that decent gear is so cheap and, for all the complaints about Millets, readily available. Even in my hometown, St Helens - miles from any mountain, anyone can get leather or waterproof material boots, hiking socks, cheap synthetic base layers, cheap waterproof and breathable jackets and bottoms, etc.

DonTregartha
02-03-2010, 11:03 PM
What is really annoying it that decent gear is so cheap and, for all the complaints about Millets, readily available.

Try buying a breathable jacket and waterproof boots for a ten year old in Millets.

Plenty of pink stuff for four year old girls to go out across the car park in the rain.

Try and get stuff to take your kids up a mountain in.

Mine are now older and they fit he grown up stuff, but there was a massive hole in the core scout age ranges.

Know what you mean about the mudless boots though! All that gear and they walk up the roads!

Hey ho.

recneps
02-03-2010, 11:34 PM
does anyone know why people think crocs are good shoes to bring on a camp? I absolutely hate them.

We had a kid who wore crocs to camp, and tried walking on the pallets on the wood pile - got a nail in his foot.

Having been told to find some more suitable shoes, we then caught him standing around an open-sided altar fire in flip flops

Doh

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we were very recently in poland for a long weekend, it snowed the whole time and the temp was -2 for most days. we had a webcam of krakow on our website so everyone could see how it was before we went, we also had the weather report displayed and as usual gave everyone a kit list. Comfortable walking boots, somehow got converted to deck shoes / plimsolls. The said child also had no gloves or decent coat...............
Apparently his dad is a survival expert, you could not make it up.

I was in Krakow at the start of February and lived in coat, gloves and walking boots even just to walk around town. Some kids/parents are just stoooopid.

Alfbranch
03-03-2010, 01:56 AM
Know what you mean about the mudless boots though! All that gear and they walk up the roads!
The requirements for scaling the North Face of Keswick high Street are Three Season boots treking poles and full waterproofs 364 days of the year.




On the other day you only need a waterproof jacket.:tong:

You actually see them change into this stuff and head to the high street:rolling_s

Ashbourne_Akela
03-03-2010, 10:29 AM
footwear, gloves decent coat.

The number of times you could just get up and get out of the hut, if the blighters turned up in something sensible.

I used to bang on about this and even dragged kids out in their shirt sleeves in the rain.

Still they turn out in the heavy snowfall, jumping out of the warm car in scout shirt and trainers.

Do parents not understand we do outdoors?


I had this last week. It had snowed, but we were going out. No, really, we ARE going out! Got no coat? Go and do a Cinderella job from the left ones in the hallway. Got no gloves? Keep your hands in your pockets. Got your good trainers on? Tough, you shouldn't have worn them to Cubs in the first place!!!:smash:

Doug in Canada
03-03-2010, 11:41 AM
I've planned outside activities in January (where our normal evening temps are -15C and we hav about 1000 snow on the ground only to discover that one of them has no boots and no coat!! Parents had dropped him at the door in running shoes and a sweatshirt!!

Our two deep leadership rule meant we had to cancel the outside event as there were only three of us. Parents - grrr!!!

Prodigal Son
03-03-2010, 11:56 AM
Actually I quite like Crocs on camp!! :banana::banana::tong:

Mainly because I have a minimal kit for morning rule. The more you have on the more there will be to collect dew from the ground. So for me it's shorts and crocs/ Nike Jerusalem's (sandals!:rolleyes:) Oh and big jumper - cos I'm starting to feel the cold now!!

Always done it like this since being a lad

CilDroichid
03-03-2010, 12:35 PM
we had to cancel the outside event Maybe I'm just mean and horrible, but I would have phoned the parents and said come & collect Johnny as he can't come with us. Not fair on the rest who have turned up in the correct gear.

Doug in Canada
03-03-2010, 12:37 PM
Oh we tried that - guess who had gone to do some grocery shopping while son was at cubs!!

Shaun
03-03-2010, 12:52 PM
I have a standing rule that they should always bring a coat and a torch.

Every so often, I will have a programme planned where they would need either or both, if they haven't got it then tough, slowly the message got through.

Learnt an important lesson on the last camp though, We went out for a hike in the snow, I checked the foot wear as they arrived and made a mental not of who had boots and who had wellies, didn't take account of my son who I knew had boots but had also packed his wellies.

I'm sure the blisters taught him to wear boots when he has them, but from now on I'll check everyone, even those I know have the correct equipment.

Doug in Canada
03-03-2010, 01:54 PM
Ahhh, foolish parent, you thought that just because he had them he would use them!! I too have been caught out by that assumption! Out tobogganing and a cub comes to me and says he is cold. It is only at this point I notice he does not have snow pants on! "Didn't you bring snow pants, they were on the list?", answer "yes, they're hanging by the door in the lodge". Find tree, bang head!!

DuncanHill
03-03-2010, 01:57 PM
Find tree, bang head!!

We're not allowed to bang our Cubs' heads against trees!

Shaun
03-03-2010, 02:00 PM
We're not allowed to bang our Cubs' heads against trees!

Are you sure:confused:

I've checked POR and it doesn't say we can't.......................





Only joking :bigsmiley

Ashbourne_Akela
03-03-2010, 02:28 PM
Find tree, bang head!!

:bigsmiley That made me laugh!

Ashbourne_Akela
03-03-2010, 02:29 PM
Are you sure:confused:

I've checked POR and it doesn't say we can't.......................







:bigsmileyThat made me laugh even more!!!!:bigsmiley

roger-uk
03-03-2010, 05:28 PM
I had this last week. It had snowed, but we were going out. No, really, we ARE going out! Got no coat? Go and do a Cinderella job from the left ones in the hallway. Got no gloves? Keep your hands in your pockets. Got your good trainers on? Tough, you shouldn't have worn them to Cubs in the first place!!!:smash:

Ohhh a woman after my own heart. We're going on a night hike - what happens if its wet - wear a waterproof or get wet

Doug in Canada
03-03-2010, 07:47 PM
Speaking of waterproofs (or raincoats as we call them in the colonies!) I can't believe how many parents send their kids to camp with a so-called raincoat that is in fact a nylon covered, fleece lined jacket. Ten minutes in any sort of a rain and it has already started to soak through yet they expecttheir kids to be able to play outside all day long in the rain in one of these!

dasy2k1
03-03-2010, 10:49 PM
the most unsuitible bit of equipment i have had a cub bring was a readybed.... if you have met one of these its basically a full slzed single airbed with a built in sleeping bag.
naturally it diddnt fit in the nijer tent that 6 were sharing, so he had to sleep with it deflated .... the next camp he ahd learned his lesson and came with a normal sleeping bag and foam mat

Doug in Canada
04-03-2010, 01:42 PM
the most unsuitible bit of equipment i have had a cub bring was a readybed.... if you have met one of these its basically a full slzed single airbed with a built in sleeping bag.
naturally it diddnt fit in the nijer tent that 6 were sharing, so he had to sleep with it deflated .... the next camp he ahd learned his lesson and came with a normal sleeping bag and foam mat

I had one show up with a double sized air mattress!! We did the same thing and he too learned his lesson and we never saw it again!

vulcan-network
09-03-2010, 10:57 AM
I am one of those who live in shorts. hiking up a mountain had my shorts on got told off by the group leader for being stupid :(

had 2 mates do a 10 mile night hike in jeans, and just last weekend i did a hike without a warm coat! was Freezing :(


they dont get better whn they grow up :P

tdjno
09-03-2010, 11:11 AM
I am one of those who live in shorts. hiking up a mountain had my shorts on

Good to hear, longs are completely banned in our group. Shorts are far more practical and it is the head and upper not being properly wrapped up that makes you cold and not the legs. Skin is also easy to wash and waterproof; oh and it repairs itself too!

Longs last about 2 minutes in camp before getting dirty (i.e. kneel down) and are dangerous around fires.

vulcan-network
09-03-2010, 11:38 AM
Thats what i always say, as long as the vitals are kept warm then all is ok, also shorts take up less room in the bag.

I do also take a few 'cosmetics' mainly normal wash kit, facecream and hair gel! (a must on camp obviously lol)

ASLChris
09-03-2010, 11:53 AM
Longs last about 2 minutes in camp before getting dirty (i.e. kneel down) and are dangerous around fires.

How are trousers dangerous around fires?!

tdjno
09-03-2010, 12:00 PM
How are trousers dangerous around fires?!

When cooking in trench fires is it very possible that the trouser leg could be caught when stepping around it, when tending the fire, etc. (use your imagination), or something could fall out etc.

Either way, it has been our group’s policy since it was formed as a traditional group in 1982. You can dispute it if you like but there are hundreds of reasons why long trousers are not suitable for camps and hikes etc.

ASLChris
09-03-2010, 12:37 PM
When cooking in trench fires is it very possible that the trouser leg could be caught when stepping around it, when tending the fire, etc. (use your imagination), or something could fall out etc.


No more dangerous than a pair of socks!

IMHO it is more dangerous to wear shorts around a fire as there is greater likelihood of YOU getting burned rather than a little hole in your trousers.

jediwannabe
09-03-2010, 12:42 PM
When cooking in trench fires is it very possible that the trouser leg could be caught when stepping around it, when tending the fire, etc. (use your imagination), or something could fall out etc.

Either way, it has been our group’s policy since it was formed as a traditional group in 1982. You can dispute it if you like but there are hundreds of reasons why long trousers are not suitable for camps and hikes etc.

Long trousers are highly recommended for hiking here. Far too many things that can bite and sting you to risk not wearing long pants. That said, nobody ever does :thup:

Chris Lambert
09-03-2010, 01:20 PM
You can dispute it if you like but there are hundreds of reasons why long trousers are not suitable for camps and hikes etc.

And hundreds of reasons why shorts are not suitable too. For hikes there are often hundres of reasons growing in one place ready to give you a nice sting as you walk through them.

The key is to have the right equipment at the right time. Sometimes that's shorts, sometimes that's trousers.

tdjno
09-03-2010, 02:18 PM
And hundreds of reasons why shorts are not suitable too. For hikes there are often hundres of reasons growing in one place ready to give you a nice sting as you walk through them.

The key is to have the right equipment at the right time. Sometimes that's shorts, sometimes that's trousers.

That is what long socks are for! As I say, we do not wear long trousers uniform or otherwise, and it isn’t my decision anyway.

nele
09-03-2010, 03:46 PM
Local advice on campsites here is to wear long trousers and tuck them into your socks to prevent deer ticks getting onto your legs.

Which doesn't stop the local scouts wearing shorts in midwinter.. although I notice the girls have an advantage because they wear wooly tights underneath their uniform mini skirts. (I think the skirts start reasonably long at age 11 and get progressively shorter as people grow)

We wear long trousers. Even the ladies don't wear skirts to scout in.. very impractical particularly when climbing etc

NAG2GSY
10-03-2010, 03:28 PM
Even the ladies don't wear skirts to scout in.. very impractical particularly when climbing etc

that would depend on your viewpoint... :D

"long socks" and shorts to counter the effects of midges in the summer? That would be worth seeing, long sleeves and long trousers - you would be bitten to bits overwise

I've never seen anybody set their trousers on fire whilst cooking, does that happen often in England?

CilDroichid
10-03-2010, 05:52 PM
never seen anybody set their trousers on fire Um... one of our scouts managed to do exactly that from the camp fire just this weekend.

To be fair it was -5C and we were all pretty much sitting on top of the fire to keep warm! :)

kaastpauls
10-03-2010, 07:58 PM
We did a two day hike, one scout brought a suitcase.

The leader in charge for a camp coming up in a few weeks has said on the kit list for a survival camp, swim shorts and three pairs of foot ware and plenty of clothes. Is there something he is not telling me?

boomer_ie
10-03-2010, 08:27 PM
Good to hear, longs are completely banned in our group. Shorts are far more practical and it is the head and upper not being properly wrapped up that makes you cold and not the legs. Skin is also easy to wash and waterproof; oh and it repairs itself too!

Longs last about 2 minutes in camp before getting dirty (i.e. kneel down) and are dangerous around fires.

I cannot understand anyone advocating banning of long trousers for scouting especially in cold environments. You need to remember that the cold extremities (legs included) cool down the blood which returns to the central core area of the body which itself cools down leading to a vicious cycle that can lead to hypothermia which is a major problem if not treated soon enough.

I find that cold feet are a major demoraliser on camp so adding cold legs would see all scouts etc vanish never to be seen again!

Graham Hannam
10-03-2010, 08:40 PM
Leaning heavily back towards the true spirit of the thread...:smash:

We have a camp coming up and I plan to bring in "the required kit" a couple of weeks in a row and have it laid out for the parents to see. This will include such things as proper waterproofs and a three or four season sleeping bag.

I may even sit with the kit and explain to them what it all is and why it is all needed rather than simply leaving a note on it...

tdjno
11-03-2010, 02:37 PM
I cannot understand anyone advocating banning of long trousers for scouting especially in cold environments. You need to remember that the cold extremities (legs included) cool down the blood which returns to the central core area of the body which itself cools down leading to a vicious cycle that can lead to hypothermia which is a major problem if not treated soon enough.

I find that cold feet are a major demoraliser on camp so adding cold legs would see all scouts etc vanish never to be seen again!

Let's just say that it is traditional. Scouts were doing this for many years before we were involved.

astwood7
11-03-2010, 03:57 PM
Let's just say that it is traditional. Scouts were doing this for many years before we were involved.

In the days before central heating and when kids actually went out to play all day every day whatever the weather ...

but each to their own ...

gregharewood
11-03-2010, 05:11 PM
Good to hear, longs are completely banned in our group. Shorts are far more practical and it is the head and upper not being properly wrapped up that makes you cold and not the legs. Skin is also easy to wash and waterproof; oh and it repairs itself too!

Longs last about 2 minutes in camp before getting dirty (i.e. kneel down) and are dangerous around fires.

The nice Doctor in Casualty seemed upset with my shorts-on-camp rule as he was unscrewing the 200th tick.

I am unrepentant. In the damp of Exmoor, it is the better compromise.

dasy2k1
11-03-2010, 05:31 PM
clahs ohlson now sell a handy little tick extraction tool, you simply slide it over the top of the tick and pull parrelel to the flesh, a neat hook in the end removes the tick including the jaws.

gregharewood
11-03-2010, 05:38 PM
clahs ohlson now sell a handy little tick extraction tool, you simply slide it over the top of the tick and pull parrelel to the flesh, a neat hook in the end removes the tick including the jaws.

Oh, these were all juvies. Billions of them. I mean, literally some kids got over 200 ticks, but most didn't get under the skin. Too weak. We got very bored of the tools and just grabbed them with tweazers, and they were coming out whole fine.

The kid wasn't in casualty for the ticks. The Doctor just seemed to think it was his duty while we were there :-).

The local guy did look suitably apologetic for not having cut the grass in the field. But Neither he nor I (and I used the field in the 80s and 90s) had ever seen anything like it before.

We had a great time :-)

tim_n
18-03-2010, 09:11 AM
Never had/seen a tick yet. They obviously don't like the smell of me. Wouldn't even know how to remove them and have never carried gear to do so. I am aware of lyme disease however...

http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/diseases/facts/lymedisease.htm

gregharewood
18-03-2010, 10:07 AM
Never had/seen a tick yet. They obviously don't like the smell of me. Wouldn't even know how to remove them and have never carried gear to do so. I am aware of lyme disease however...

http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/diseases/facts/lymedisease.htm

Happily, most of our ticks were trying to find their first meal, so probably weren't carrying anything. I've certainly had no reports of sickness after the fact. Thank God.