This Site Uses Cookies. Please Click Here to view our Cookie Policy
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17
  1. #1
    New Ideas Researcher
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    35
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Map Reading - How do you teach beginners?

    Hi Everyone

    I have been in charge of my Scout Troop for just over a year now and I am getting to grips with a lot of the work. One thing I have not yet tackled is teaching Map Reading to the Scouts.

    My understanding is that there was very little (if any) map reading skills taught in couple of years before I took up the challenge so I will be teaching from scratch.

    Does anyone have any fun/exiting/interesting/different ways of teaching Map Reading skills to a group of 38 Scouts???

    Cheers
    Tim Robinson
    Assistant Scout Leader
    1st Laceby Scout Troop - Humberside County



    "You know you're a Scout when your social life is Scouting!"

    "Scout's do it in the mud!"

  2. #2
    Assistant Beaver Leader Keith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Yarm, England
    Posts
    3,144
    Thanks
    25
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Well Id start with some compass skills, make sure they know all the points of a compass, maybe a game. Then id do a quiz on map symbols. Id then ask them all individually to point to various bits on a map of the local area get them confident with that. If you can I would go around the local area (not the immediate local area), get them to set up the map the right way and get them to check that all the nearby focal points are all where the scouts think they are.
    Keith "Hawkeye"
    Assistant Beaver Scout Leader (Woodbadge)
    1st Ingleby Barwick (St Francis) Scout Group



  3. #3
    is it senior or very old TRH's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Belfast
    Posts
    2,500
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    A big cardboard box on the head, let me explain.

    Each Scout has to follow a number of Bearings from a set point. Each bearing is supossed to lead them to a specific point. They cannot use line of sight as the box on the head stops them. You can pace the route before hand so for example you can say to them take 15 paces at a bearing of 80 degree. A peg or mark can locate the area they are supposed to end up.


    Give them a set of bearings, some pegs, and some sisal. You will have the course prepared earlier. The idea is to make a simple shape, like a House. With the bearings (and distances between) they have to mark and attache the sisal and eventually come up with the set design

    ASL, 81st St Bartholomews (South Belfast)

    CEOP Ambassador

    Camp 2008/09

    Antiquis temporibus, nati tibi similes in rupibus ventosissimis exponebantur ad necem.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Kastor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,349
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 36 Times in 22 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by TRH View Post
    Give them a set of bearings, some pegs, and some sisal. You will have the course prepared earlier. The idea is to make a simple shape, like a House. With the bearings (and distances between) they have to mark and attache the sisal and eventually come up with the set design
    We've done this one before as well.

    As chocolate is always a good motivator why not do a form of geocaching where you place choccy bars around an area and give them bearings from various fixed points to the chocolate.

    Crunchie - 100 yrds - bearing 270 from the old oak tree etc.

    You could start to make it more difficult by putting in multiple legs with the next bearing as the "prize" at the intermediate points.
    To get more kids we need more adults - are we getting the message yet?

  5. #5
    Moderator fmolesey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    3,447
    Thanks
    63
    Thanked 18 Times in 16 Posts
    We use the 'Map reading made easy peasy' leaflets that can be ordered from this page..

    http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswe...ces/index.html

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Nottingham
    Posts
    94
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    The ideas above are good and we've used variations on all of them, but they are biased towards compass skills rather than map-reading skills (just as important, but not the same.)

    Don't forget things like grid references and interpreting terrain from the contours etc.

    At the end of a map skills session I have run quizzes based on the skills learned - What type of building is at grid reference GQ123567? What bearing does the footpath leaving the carpark at SK675432 follow?
    Etc.
    The quiz uses a whole range of maps so part of the problems is selecting the right map.

    Patrol points for the most/quickest correct answers.

    Another thing the scouts enjoy is using a computer program like Memory Map (recommended for DofE) to put in a route on a map (great way to make route cards.) The computer can then "fly" round the terrain on the route. MM is not cheap, but is less than a full set of OS maps.

    Simon

    PS those GRs are made up don't try and look them up.

  7. #7
    bit of everything!
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    1,210
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    We also use the OS leaflets that Max has mentioned, but before that we look at local maps to ensure everyone knows wherethey live, and where it is in relation to the locality, meeting place etc.
    I have found with Cubs just starting out with maps, I give them a 8 inch square of paper with a 2 inch square cut out of it, so they only concentrate on a small amount of the map, otherwise there is too much to look at.

  8. #8
    John Anderson JPA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    East Kilbride, United Kingdom
    Posts
    289
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    One technique I have used is to have a realy game.

    At the other end of the hall from each team is a local map. Each member of the team is then given a street name to find on the map. It just happens to be the street that they live in.

    After that, they swap the streets round and try to find different ones.

    To help with grid references what about giving each patrol blank grids and having a game of battle ships? They have to call out a grid reference in order to fire at the other ships.
    Scout Leader
    Beaver Leader
    Group Contact

    www.6theastkilbride.com

    ADC Scouts - Strathcalder

    www.strathcalderscouts.org

  9. #9
    ESL and DESC ianw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    2,804
    Thanks
    107
    Thanked 113 Times in 56 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by JPA View Post
    To help with grid references what about giving each patrol blank grids and having a game of battle ships? They have to call out a grid reference in order to fire at the other ships.
    You've sunk my trig point!
    Ian Wilkins
    Farnham District Explorers Scout Commissioner


    5-7th September 2014 - for all Explorers and Network
    Discos, fancy dress, karaoke, games, camp fire, stuff, and all day Saturday at Thorpe Park
    http://www.summitnetwork.org.uk/tpc
    http://www.facebook.com/themeparkcamp
    http://www.twitter.com/themeparkcamp

  10. #10
    is it senior or very old TRH's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Belfast
    Posts
    2,500
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Grid Ref battleships, how simple and how clever, and I supose a simple adaptation would be to blow up Churches and especiallt Golf Courses

    ASL, 81st St Bartholomews (South Belfast)

    CEOP Ambassador

    Camp 2008/09

    Antiquis temporibus, nati tibi similes in rupibus ventosissimis exponebantur ad necem.

  11. #11
    General Dogsbody gerbil's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Glasgow
    Posts
    934
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    PS those GRs are made up don't try and look them up.
    The first one doesn't exist but the second one is a stream just outside Gunthorpe just east of Nottingham

    (I'm on a study break)
    What do you care what other people think! - Richard P. Feynman

    A person needs only three tools in life: WD-40, duct tape and a hammer. If it doesn't move and it should, use the WD-40. If it moves and it shouldn't, use the duct tape. If either doesn't work, use the hammer.

    http://www.sugs.co.uk

  12. #12
    Senior Member Mang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Ware, Hertfordshire
    Posts
    1,949
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I've recently ordered some free training booklets from Ordinance Survey (haven't arrived yet) but they are also available as pdfs on their site.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Hetherset, Norwich.
    Posts
    75
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I have done a lot of work with maps and navigation with my old Troop (we don't do it so much in my new troop here in the USA but that is probably due to the lack of a unified OS maps series).

    Some ideas
    1) NSEW Game- Label up sides of the hall with N, S, E, W and you call out one and Scout run to touch that wall, as they game goes on you can remove signs until only N is left, you can also move that N around and finannly call out NW and other points. In the hall i never went above an 8 point compass (walls and corners).

    2) Topology - Using polystyrene sheets have each patrol pick a small region of the map and convert into a 3D section (each layer of polyseteren corresponds to a major contour line) then move patrols around and see if they can identify which map section the last patrol choose

    3) Map symbols bingo - have bingo cards made with different map symbols you then call them randomly

    4) Map symbol relay - have two sets of cards one with the symbols (face up at one end of hall) and another with text face down at other end of hall per patrol with patrosl in middle. One scout run to one end chooses a text card and then shouts out for the other scout to find correct syumbol both race back to centre and if correct next pair goes.

    5)Human battleships - make a large grid (i used a white sheet with squares drawn on) and add grid refs.

    6) Design an island, have a large island drawn on a map with a few features. Give one to each patrol then call out instructions like there is a church with tower at the most northley point, a river runs NE to SW from the church, then see how well they match up to what you had.

    7) One thing i prepared (but never ran) was a little photo game. I was having my car serviced in a village near Malton (Yorks.) and decided to walk into Malton and took photos every so often along the route i took. I then told the scouts my start and end points (Grid refs) and a few hints about the route (mainly that i crossed the big A road by bridge at grid ref) and they had to work out where i took the photos. I still have the photos on my hard drive and the maps are back at the parents for when i return to the UK.

    8) The last idea was a base i did at a summer fun camp we did (and i can't remember quite how we set this up) but basically i had a grid with balloons about 6ft off the ground and a start point the instructions were bearings and distences (like bearing 180 4m) they had one scout blindfolded and one to pop the balloon if they were correct they got the clue to the next balloon if they got it wrong they got a little wet*, if they managed to find theor way through all 5 steps or so the last balloon had sweets in it. * One scout who shall remain nameless happened to have a balloon filled with flour at the end in response to a prank they played!

    I have many of these resources premade (in powerpoint) and many more activities so just contact me if you would like me to email them to you (or anyone else)

    Richard
    Last edited by rsphorler; 09-01-2009 at 06:32 PM.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Raksha's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Lymington, Hants
    Posts
    5,665
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I also believe that it is important to show people how to look at their surroundings to work out where they are on a map - i.e, plonk them down somewhere and give them the map and say - show me! I sent a group of cubs out on an orienteering course round a camp site without compasses to get this one through - they managed it, but moaned about how tough it was. How to read a road map when travelling in the car, how to use A-Z's (I know I know, but how many kids get the chance to use them in these days of sat nav??)
    The truth is rarely pure and never simple - Oscar Wilde

  15. #15
    bit of everything!
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    1,210
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    We have also compared maps. An A-Z is good for finding someone's house, but not much use when driving to visit granny in Scotland, when you would use a road atlas. Different types of maps have different purposes.
    We also play a map symbols action game (came from Scouting magazine in the mid 90s). Ten basic map symbols that you can make the shape with your body [golf course, camp site, picnic site...] once they have learnt the different symbols, they run around and on the whistle, you call a symbol while holding up the picture, the YP make that shape and then on to the next one.
    Most of them learnt those symbols successfully!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 24-02-2013, 01:11 AM
  2. Those who can teach!
    By tim_n in forum Scouting Talk
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 25-03-2010, 11:30 AM
  3. Wide Game for Beginners?
    By Dramatist in forum Scouts
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 02-08-2008, 10:09 AM
  4. Suggestions please, beginners guide
    By Richard in forum Website Design & Coding Help & Advice
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 28-07-2004, 07:37 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •