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Chris
22-09-2003, 12:50 PM
Dose anyone know of any web sites that give advice on the types of food and the recomended calorie intake for hill walking?

Craig
22-09-2003, 04:38 PM
Pot Noodles are quite good, but you have to have a large water supply

mattw
22-09-2003, 06:17 PM
Pot Noodles are quite good, but you have to have a large water supply

umm, thats bullsh1t im afraid, pot noodles contain no nutritional stuff at all and do you no good.

First choice for main meals would be Wayfarer boil in the bag ones, they're good and they actually taste nice. Even better if you can get hold of them are the army ration packs cos they have more stuff in them as well as the boil in a bag food and if you can find a good place to get them they are about the same price.

As far as other food goes mainly just eat mars bars and the like, and sweets, as they contain loads of sugar and help keep your energy up. You also need to make sure you never get thirsty else you're already dehydrated, and drink shedloads before you do any walking. Just to give you an idea the 2 days before we started 10 Tors we were drinking 5 litres of water a day on top of any other drinks.

As for reccomended calorie intake it depends of who you are and i cant remember the average or how you work it out off hand, im sure Google will remember tho :P

hth

Matt

Dave
22-09-2003, 08:20 PM
Pot Noodles are quite good, but you have to have a large water supply

umm, thats bullsh1t im afraid, pot noodles contain no nutritional stuff at all and do you no good.

First choice for main meals would be Wayfarer boil in the bag ones, they're good and they actually taste nice. Even better if you can get hold of them are the army ration packs cos they have more stuff in them as well as the boil in a bag food and if you can find a good place to get them they are about the same price.

As far as other food goes mainly just eat mars bars and the like, and sweets, as they contain loads of sugar and help keep your energy up. You also need to make sure you never get thirsty else you're already dehydrated, and drink shedloads before you do any walking. Just to give you an idea the 2 days before we started 10 Tors we were drinking 5 litres of water a day on top of any other drinks.

As for reccomended calorie intake it depends of who you are and i cant remember the average or how you work it out off hand, im sure Google will remember tho :P

hth

Matt

I agree with Matt pot noodles are a waste of time and effort. A few years ago our Scouts worked out you would have to eat 13 pot noodles to get the same nutritional value as a "normal" two course meal. :onfire: What we have done recently is to pre-cook stews and freeze them and just re-heat them when needed. I personally hate the pre-packed stuff and there is never enough apart from the crazy price they charge you for them. No need to carry extra water and the only rubbish you take home is a freezer bag. Breakfasts are easy two or three weetabix or shredded wheat in a bag with some dried milk and sugar, just add hot water. Plenty of hot sweet tea to drink with boiled sweets to suck to help with the sugar/energy levels. Remember your emergency rations as well, I normally take a couple of Topics with me because I hate the things and unless push comes to shove I won't eat them unless really necessary.

Dave

Bloory
22-09-2003, 09:52 PM
Sensible advice Dave.

I usually advocate beanfeast or similar boil in the bag from the supermarket. Yes they don't taste very nice, but neither do the ready meals - the supermarket stuff is cheaper too. You can do things like pasta sauce with beanfeast bolognese nicely on a trrangia.

mattw
22-09-2003, 09:59 PM
another thing we have done before is to mix up a porridge/dried milk/sugar mix and then add water to it for a breakfast.

good tip to take emergency rations that you dont like, thats why the army rat-paks are so good cos a lot of the stuff in them is rank.

as dave said the ones where you have to add water are not as good, for a start you have to carry the extra water and secondly it gets the trangia pan dirty, boil in the bag means no washing up will be needed :-D

In all fairness i dont think the boil in a bag type meals are bad at all, certainly not the Wayfarer or army ones, although when youve done a long hike in the pooring rain i suppose anything hot would taste good. And yeah they are expensive, the last lot we bought cost £2.79 per meal

Martyn
28-09-2003, 07:21 PM
I have started carrying things that most people class as heavy

TINS

The reason being - I'm growing to hate the taste of dehydrated food

My favourite at present is Chunky Chicken/ Chicken supreme and Rice
Yes I know it comes in a tin but how much does the same amount of dehyrated gunk with the water an fuel you add to boil it for 10 minutes.

Oh yea - Chocolate

Martyn

mattw
29-09-2003, 10:59 AM
just to clarify the stuff i was on about is not dehydrated, its basically what you might buy in a tin but in a bag instead, therefore being lighter and meaning you can cook it without skanking a pan up. Also tins are bulkier to carry and you need to have a tin opener with you (i refuse to count the bent but of metal on a swiss army knife as a tin opener). depends how far you're going and what you prefer though i suppose.

eastleigh
29-09-2003, 05:07 PM
another thing we have done before is to mix up a porridge/dried milk/sugar mix and then add water to it for a breakfast.

On the same but slightly different note, have you tried the same recipy but switching the porridge for Alpen? If you get the "true" Alpen and not Tescos own brand, you can very often do away with the dried milk and sugar, 'cos it's already in there.

AS for emergency rations, we tend to take them and securely the lot tightly inside masking tape. This is then signed across a join by the leader. This ensures that the rations stay sealed, because they can't get to them without breaking the leader's signature. It's a bit draconian, but works well - especially when you get the Scout who is adamant that he has not broken into his rations 10 mins into the first day (and within sight of the start line!)