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Thread: Disability Awareness

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    Member Jerrers's Avatar
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    Disability Awareness

    Hello,

    I am looking to run an evening based around the various disabilities that we can encounter in everyday life.

    Loss of senses, limbs, movements etc

    If there are any good resourses out here, or if youi have some ideas for games and a moment for reflection for those that are not as fortunate as the majority

    This will make a Cub Leader very happy

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    Senior Member Bushfella's Avatar
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    Blindfold tasks
    Make them wear badly scratched safety glasses and then try reading a book.
    One handed tasks - tie a knot, button up a jaket, zip a jacket
    One legged tasks - climb steps, carry a cup of water
    Walk with odd sized legs ( use those little bucket stilts, but only give them one)


    I call them tasks because if you call them games they quite often miss the point.

    They can learn makaton

    Get them to stand in line without talking, by date of birth, alphabetical order etc..
    Ewan Scott

    It seems that there are a lot of Nawyecka Comanch around....





    Nawyecka Comanch'": "Means roundabout--man says he's going one way, means to go t'other" Ethan Edwards - The Searchers



    www.upperdearnevalleynavigators.org.uk

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    At camp a couple of weeks ago (with a pirate theme) we "handicapped" some of the Cubs before breakfast - and then asked them to get on with cooking breakfast.
    (10 mins for the first tin of tomatoes to be opened!)

    Some able boddied were allowed to help but the handicapped had to be fully involved in the cooking.

    One had vaseline on goggles, a couple had pirate eye patches. some had their dominant hand tied behind their back and three had police leg restraints around their thighs!

    Itworked well - we didn't have to say anything - they just discovered for themselves.
    Kate, CSL (and GDB(S))
    1st Weald Brook Scout Group
    Brentwood, Essex
    www.1stwealdbrook.org.uk

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    I have used an activity where you spilt the participants into patrols or small groups. Give each member a disibility such as:
    One blindfolded
    One has to remain sat down
    One with ear defenders or ear plugs
    One not allowed to speak
    One with big gloves or with a hand tied behind their back etc.


    Then between them all with garden canes, string or tape, paper and pens, between the group they have to build a flag pole and draw a flag and attach it to the pole. This highlights the issues of each disability and also encourages team work.

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    ASL and YLUL wealdbrook's Avatar
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    Pass the parcel - using your feet to pass and open!

    Blindfold feely bag - wearing a blindfold take out an item and describe it to others also blindfolded.
    John Alexander,
    ASL and Assistant Webmaster
    1st Weald Brook
    http://www.1stwealdbrook.org.uk
    ESL(YL) Brentwood District

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    Programmes on line have produced the attached document for disability awareness.

    I ran an activity for my explorers by blindfolding, earplugs & defenders, restricted a use of their strong arm, prevented speech and confined one of the YP to a wheelchair I borrowed and made them put up a patrol tent normally an easy task - took well over an hour whilst incapacitated.

    Really made them think.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Deputy Regional Commissioner South East England

    E-mail drcsoutheast at scouts.org.uk

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    bit of everything!
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    You can get them building lego or making a puzzle (toddler size) wearing gloves.
    Make a sandwich/write their name/catch a bean bag/cut out a shape using their non dominant hand.

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    Diversity Ambassador Lynn-Cubs's Avatar
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    Don't just focus on physical disability.

    Give them a puzzle that can't be completed because some of the information is missing - a Rubix Cube where the colours have been changed or a jigsaw where the picture does not match the pieces.

    Can one of the leaders tell a story and 'put on' a stutter?

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    Senior Member Doug in Canada's Avatar
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    I've borrowed a wheelchair and had them take turns sitting in it for 20 minutes at a time and having to do whatever the pack is doing during that time from opening circle to playing games. Worked quite well.
    Akela - 6th Burlington Cub Pack

    www.6thburlingtoncubs.org

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug in Canada View Post
    I've borrowed a wheelchair and had them take turns sitting in it for 20 minutes at a time and having to do whatever the pack is doing during that time from opening circle to playing games. Worked quite well.
    You can take that exercise one stage further and tie their ankles and/or knees together wih a bandage or a necker then get them to negotiate a bit of the great outdoors. The results are very enlightening! I keep a spare wheelchair at the Scout Hut (in case I get a puncture or something) and all mine have had a go.

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    Assistant Beaver Leader Keith's Avatar
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    What you have to remember is that physical disabilities (that you can see) arent the only types of disabilities. Theres people out there who have disabilities that you cant see just by looking at them. Theres emotional and mental disabilities too!
    Keith "Hawkeye"
    (Acting) Beaver Scout Section Leader (Woodbadge)
    Group Executive Committee Member
    Group Badge Secretary
    Group Web Manager
    Fundraising Co-ordinator - Group Family Camp 2018
    1st Ingleby Barwick (St Francis) Scout Group



    https://www.inglebybarwickscouts.org.uk


    WE NEED MORE ADULT VOLUNTEERS!
    Volunteer at 1st Ingleby Barwick Scout Group
    Section Leaders, Assistant Section Leaders, Sectional Assistants, Occasional Helpers, etc.


  12. #12
    Member Jerrers's Avatar
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    thanks guys for all your replies

    we will be running with a programme with various disabilities involved tomorrow nght

    if it goes well i'll post it, if it doesn't i'll post it anyways

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    Member Big Jon's Avatar
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    In Wales we have an all Wales YL group called Team X, designed for YL's from rural areas to get training and meet with other YL's, and a few training events are run every year.

    Last year I was running the module called Special People, so I had the Explorers put up tents with one member of each group having a disability. I asked one person from each group to volunteer to have a disability for the task, when one of the Explorers came forward and informed me he wouldn't need to pretend as he had Aspergers and could quite easily fill the role.

    I also then had the guy assisting me pretending to be a Scout with ADHD, so he was going around the groups "helping" them, but in reality causing chaos. They got on quite well, even though a girl from one group thought that the correct way to deal with the "Scout" with ADHD was to batter him with a tent pole!
    ASL 1st Loughor Scouts

    AESL Caws Mawr Explorers

    Glamorgan West Network


    MDM Glamorgan West


    www.gwscouts.org.uk

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    Senior Member Jay Biggs's Avatar
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    Have a word with your local red cross group, they may be able to loan you a wheel chair to be used in to explain mobility problems and such

    maybe a feeling game, where you blind fold a kid and have them try and guess what an object is by how it feels
    Being a Scout leader is a constant reminder why some animals eat their young.


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    Senior Member Bushfella's Avatar
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    I also then had the guy assisting me pretending to be a Scout with ADHD, so he was going around the groups "helping" them, but in reality causing chaos. They got on quite well, even though a girl from one group thought that the correct way to deal with the "Scout" with ADHD was to batter him with a tent pole!
    SHOCK! It isn't!?

    OMG, I've been doing it wrong all these years. All those kids I've cured of their behavioural problems by beating them with a big lump of wood. I'll need to go around and get then counselling now that I realise the error of my ways.
    Ewan Scott

    It seems that there are a lot of Nawyecka Comanch around....





    Nawyecka Comanch'": "Means roundabout--man says he's going one way, means to go t'other" Ethan Edwards - The Searchers



    www.upperdearnevalleynavigators.org.uk

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