View Poll Results: What do you think about the resources available to support Special Needs in Scouting?

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  • There are enough, good resources available now.

    17 19.10%
  • The resources available are good, but there are not enough.

    52 58.43%
  • There are not enough resources and they are of a poor standard.

    20 22.47%
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Thread: Special Needs Scouting

  1. #46
    Member of 9th Irene BOAST jediwannabe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Testarossa View Post
    We always get on the plane first with my son (he is high functioning autism) and we try to sit by the exit door so we can get off first. The problem with getting off is that despite the seatbelt lights being on, passengers get up to get their bags and you can't get through the scrum to get off first unless you are by the exit.

    Worth asking which exits will be opening on landing as some airlines filter everyone off through one door (usually Ryanair and Thomsonfly)
    I don't know much (or anything) about autism, but wouldn't perhaps be better to wait until everybody else has gotten off the plane? I'm just wondering
    Assistant Troop Scouter for 9th Irene Air Scouts
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  2. #47
    Senior Member big chris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jediwannabe View Post
    I don't know much (or anything) about autism, but wouldn't perhaps be better to wait until everybody else has gotten off the plane? I'm just wondering
    1) autism - v broad term. everything from keen stamp collector to person with no apparent connection with external stimulus can be classed as autistic.

    2) queuing with an autistic child can be tough. expecting him or her to understand something like 'having to wait your turn' is difficult. to try to teach that lesson on crowded plane is daft. there are better places to teach about queuing... alton towers is a classic. 2 hr wait for gratification.

  3. #48
    IanJames ianjames's Avatar
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    Special needs scouting is a very emotive area, the range of disabilities both visiable and invisiable can be too much for a lot of leaders to contend with. As a group we have I hope always tried to accomodate those disabled young people who have wanted to join us and i think for the most part we have been sucessful with them, possibly because some of the leaders have first hand knowledge of the conditions we are working with or have been able to work well the young people and parents. Consequently we have always had a high number of special needs young people in the group because it is known we will take them where other groups won't. In all the time I have been involved only once have I refused to take a Young person away on activities and that was on H & S grounds because I couldn't spare 2 leaders to watch and follow him when he decided to dissapear.
    I would agrea there are a wealth of fact sheets concerning a multitude of conditions BUT the written word doesn't answer spacific questions that leaders may have, it only generalises.
    As for district, we donot have a special needs advisor, and the County organised event we attended was next to useless. Those there had more idea than the people putting on the event.
    Requirements for badges can be tailored for all young people, we do not changew the program, just accept that some will do better than others on a lot of things, its the effort put into it that matters.
    Ian Turner
    Cub Leader, TA & ADC Cubs
    2nd & 7th Welwyn Garden City Scout Group


    http://www.wgcscouts.co.uk

  4. #49
    BSL (Squirrel) Mrs Chug's Avatar
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    I have two Autistic children in our group of Beavers, one of them is my son.

    So I am quite lucky to have already been on a course, when he was diagnosed, on how to comunicate with him and on how to calm him down as he does get very excitable but he also finds it very difficult deal with long sentances and getting him to wait is also most impossible. So when looking at and planing an activity I am thinking on two levels one for the more able beavers and on a different level or working out how best to explain to those who have difficulty in understanding. I have also had the chance of working with special needs children and adults incl those with down syndrome and md.

    And on apersonal note I have also had experience of dealing with a child having a heart problem, as my daughter had tetrolgy of fallots till she was 8 months old and under went open heart surgery, so I know what to look out for in children with these types of difficulty. And as I myself have been diabetic for 27 years and as I only have one hand, I am able to look at it from all points. As on a personal note I have been the victim of the "Do you take sugar, syndrome". But as some may class me as disabled, I have never viewed myself as this as I have never known anything different as far as my hand is concerned.

    I have alsways taken part in everything that I can and will always do my best, I have completed rock climbing and absailing, Number 1 Para assualt course in Aldershot, I drive a manuel car, the only thing I can't do is knit, but that is no great loss. But the key thing I don't do is judge, I will let a child try everything if I think that they are having problems I will say have you thought of trying to do it this way, they will always find their own way round things.

  5. #50
    Senior Member Taeniura's Avatar
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    The attitudes in society have changed over the years and in my opinion we now accept that YP with disabilities have as much right to take part in activities as able bodied YP. My old group in London had a delightful YP with Cerebral Palsy. He joined the group as a Beaver and when I left he had just achieved his Chief Scouts Gold Award. One of his parents used to attend and help in the early days but he asked them to stop coming when he reached Cubs as he did not want to be marked out as special.His fellow Cubs took a pride in helping him, he appreciated that there were some games that he could not do in his wheelchair so he helped referee, other games he was a demon player. He used to sail with the Group as a Scout and has continued on to Explorers.It is amazing where wheel chairs can go now and I am sure that he will go far.

    We used to have a Cub in my new Group with ADHD who was a bit of a handful, I contacted the District SNA she promised to come over and help and advise but never turned up so we just coped on our own. We were asked to take a YP with Downs last year. Two of us went to see the Mother as no one in the Group has any experience of Downs. She explained to us all the problems we talked about the Scout program and what Scouting had to offer, two days later his Mother rang me and said that she had decided that he was not going to come, no reason was given.

    Disability is not a reason why a YP should not take part in Scouting, support is needed in some cases but the support and help that the Beavers, Cubs and Scouts can give makes it possible and confirm my faith in human nature.

    Like Mrs Chug I can't knit either but we all have different talents and life would be very boring if we were all the same
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt

  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by jediwannabe View Post
    I don't know much (or anything) about autism, but wouldn't perhaps be better to wait until everybody else has gotten off the plane? I'm just wondering
    No, cos then you have to queue at imigration to show passports. If you get off first, you can be through immigration before everyone else crowds you out

    We are off to Spain again next week. I plan to take hand luggage only, as waiting fro the bags is also a nightmare as he tries to climb on the moving belt.

  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by big chris View Post
    1) autism - v broad term. everything from keen stamp collector to person with no apparent connection with external stimulus can be classed as autistic.

    2) queuing with an autistic child can be tough. expecting him or her to understand something like 'having to wait your turn' is difficult. to try to teach that lesson on crowded plane is daft. there are better places to teach about queuing... alton towers is a classic. 2 hr wait for gratification.
    Sorry to double post, but just wanted to point out that if you take evidence of your child's disability to Alton Towers (such as DLA letter) you can get wrist bands that lets the child (or adult) and up to 3 carers board the rides from the exit, based on the fact that Autistic kids don't queue, and many rides do not accept wheelchairs though the queue.

    Alton Towers is very disability friendly.

  8. #53
    BSL (Squirrel) Mrs Chug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Testarossa View Post
    No, cos then you have to queue at imigration to show passports. If you get off first, you can be through immigration before everyone else crowds you out

    We are off to Spain again next week. I plan to take hand luggage only, as waiting fro the bags is also a nightmare as he tries to climb on the moving belt.
    I can really understand that one.

    Although we don't use that as a reason for getting through early. As we make it into a game for Kieran, the only time we have got on or off a plane early was when I broke my foot and not down to Kieran although he loved it it, being carted rounted the airport not having to walk, he sat their waving at every one as we drove by.

  9. #54
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    Apologies for digging up this old(ish) thread... but I was doing a search and stumbled upon this.

    I am an -occasional- ACSL with a pack in London (where I am doing my studies), and I do scouting in Singapore as well, that being my usual country of residence. I've recently come to meet a Scouter in Singapore who is keen to start up a special needs cub pack, where the membership would be composed of youth from a local diabetics support club. Discussions are in the works with both parties (scout leaders and the diabetics club) and the new pack is quite close to being established, but they are seeking advise from scout groups elsewhere (meaning... everywhere and anywhere in the world!) who have had some experience in catering to such special groups. This is the first time this has been attempted in my country, so we're (they're) completely new to this. Any tips on who I can contact regarding such a venture, or if anyone here has any experiences and pointers to share, it'll really be much appreciated!

  10. #55
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    I did consider setting up a Cub Pack for kids with Autism, but the amount of help I would have needed was phenominal. I don't have any advise, but with you the best of luck with this venture.

  11. #56
    SM(s) (B-PSA) RedCoat's Avatar
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    Norfolk Scout County operate a special needs Scouting unit in Norwich. I think you can find a link to the Leader through their web site.
    Richard Cullen
    Fakenham Lancaster Baden-Powell Air Scouts

    Per Exploranda ad Astra!

  12. #57
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    Can't find the link. If you know of a link to any special needs groups, please can you post it. I am trying to set up a list of special needs sections/groups for a web site I moderate for parents of children with special needs.

    Thanks.

  13. #58
    General Dogsbody gerbil's Avatar
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    Here's a link for the Glasgow Disabled Scouts http://www.glasgowdisabledscouts.org/ can't think of any more off the top of my head but i'll see what i can come up with.
    What do you care what other people think! - Richard P. Feynman

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  14. #59
    Senior Member big chris's Avatar
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  15. #60
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    These links are great. I've posted them on the Parents Side by Side website for parents who have kids with special needs to see.

    Thank you. Keep them coming please if you find any more.

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