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Thread: Camp lighting

  1. #46
    Senior Member recneps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pa_broon74 View Post
    Some of the COB and Cree LED stuff you can buy these days really does make one think one is living in the future.

    I remember as a scout bringing to camp, a torch with one of those huge square batteries in... There used to be three or four of us who were engaged in a war of torch attrition - to see who could bring the brightest to camp... Eventually, someone turned up with a torch for which, the battery was in a shoulder slung bag - it was super bright, but it wasn't practical...

    Now though, I have a head torch that can blind children at 50 paces - and I'm not afraid to use it. (Its another curiosity about kids and torches. If its dark and you're speaking, they feel the need to shine their torch in your face so they can see your lips move...)
    We always ask YP to turn their torches off if we are stood around talking to them. If i need something (e.g. something i'm holding) illuminated i'll either angle my own head torch down at it, or ask someone to shine a torch on it.

    Kids (even at scout age) seem to be obsessed with needing torches as soon as it gets just a little bit dark
    Dan Spencer

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    It is not the mountain we conquer but ourselves

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    Quote Originally Posted by recneps View Post
    We always ask YP to turn their torches off if we are stood around talking to them. If i need something (e.g. something i'm holding) illuminated i'll either angle my own head torch down at it, or ask someone to shine a torch on it.

    Kids (even at scout age) seem to be obsessed with needing torches as soon as it gets just a little bit dark
    Us too.

    And yet...

    Its like an open fire. They can't not poke it. You tell them not to and for a moment they won't, then they'll start again. Its a compunction they find impossible to control...


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    I have just purchased a LED Batlight from B&Q I think half a dozen would sort our lighting for camp has anyone tried them ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by recneps View Post
    Unfortunately in the UK, depending on the time of year, it is dark by the time we're serving dinner, and still dark when its time to start cooking breakfast. By the time we do our summer camp in late August, its starting to get dark by the time we are washing up...
    Really? On Aug 31 in London sunset will be at 7:49pm, which is about 20min later than what I'll see in Denver. Our scouts are usually starving by 5:30. Throw the food on the table at 6 and watch your fingers. It's gone in 15 minutes and then there's plenty of time to clean.

    We just use lights for dice and card games.

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    Scouts cooking for themselves can take up to three hours to prepare, eat and wash up from an evening meal...
    SL, 11th Hitchin

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    Quote Originally Posted by recneps View Post
    Unfortunately in the UK, depending on the time of year, it is dark by the time we're serving dinner, and still dark when its time to start cooking breakfast. By the time we do our summer camp in late August, its starting to get dark by the time we are washing up...
    We've (partially) solved that. Change the clocks!

    We do our week long summer camp end of August every year. When we get to the campsite we go into 'camp time' (ie BST+1). This means...

    * You get an extra hour of natural light in the evening for cooking
    * You put the clocks back on the final morning and get a lie in when everyone needs it before the big pack away and drive home.
    * You loose an hour's sleep on the first night but hey no one sleeps that well the first night anyway so who cares?

    Bert

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    Senior Member recneps's Avatar
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    our Scouts start cooking their dinner at 5... so its usually about 6.30, sometimes closer to 7, by the time they actually sit down and eat. Half an hour or so to eat, then by the time they realise they've forgotten to put washing up water on the fire its not uncommon to be washing up at gone 8pm.

    On a Feb/March camp its getting dark before Dinner even hits the table.
    Dan Spencer

    Group Scout Leader 66th Bath
    Deputy District Commissioner (Programme) - City of Bath District
    Nights Away Adviser and member of District Executive Committee - City of Bath District
    Member of Avon County Appointments Advisory Committee
    Event organiser "Be Prepared" Resilience Events
    Formerly CSL, SL, ASL and Jamboree Communications Lead

    Web designer


    It is not the mountain we conquer but ourselves

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by DKRSL View Post
    Scouts cooking for themselves can take up to three hours to prepare, eat and wash up from an evening meal...
    Quote Originally Posted by recneps View Post
    our Scouts start cooking their dinner at 5... so its usually about 6.30, sometimes closer to 7, by the time they actually sit down and eat. Half an hour or so to eat, then by the time they realise they've forgotten to put washing up water on the fire its not uncommon to be washing up at gone 8pm.
    I was told by a scout leader that time, or lack of it, is the best teacher of teamwork. My guess is if you told them there would be no lights provided and they'd have to use their own lights that the first time it would still go till 8. But maybe the next time they'd learn a bit. We still on occasion have patrols that forget time and are cleaning in the dark. For the most part they just want to be done with the work so they can go play.

    Quote Originally Posted by recneps View Post
    On a Feb/March camp its getting dark before Dinner even hits the table.
    Yes, February is rough. By March it's Spring Equinox and our scouts just eat earlier.

    Believe it or not I'm not trying to be difficult. It's just that, at least to me, leaving behind as many comforts of home that I can and just enjoying the rhythms of nature is very ... I don't even know how to describe it. Maybe combine bits of meditative, spiritual, humbling, basic, but it's all good.

    Around here we have people that drive these huge motor homes (400 sq ft is the legal limit) with satellite dishes, large screen tvs, and who knows what. I'm not sure they experience much of nature. Supposedly that's the point of having the motor home but it's self defeating. I think sunset is much better than any show on TV.

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    I think that the kind of planning involved in delivering something as simple as a meal is some of the more valuable training that we provide. Thinking when to start in order to be ready for the next programme item, making the parts of the meal arrive at the right time, thinking ahead to have washing-up water ready, teamwork to ensure that the same person doesn't wash up every time, ...

    Even if, after they get home, they only ever prepare ready meals, it's planning that can be used for other things too.
    SL, 11th Hitchin

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    We rarely end up washing up in the dark on our spring or summer camps (about equidistant around longest day) and any patrol that does knows that they are well behind schedule.

    Peter Andrews AESL of Headingley Pirates ESU, Assistant Group Scout Leader & Webmaster of Falkoner Scout Group
    www.falkonerscouts.org.uk

    Wike, North Leeds District Campsite - www.wikecampsite.org.uk
    www.leeds-solar.co.uk
    Please note all views expressed are my own and not those of any organisation I'm associated with

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    hello MattR

    I think that time zones and start times for adolescents are one of the many areas where the UK and USA are separated by a common language!

    I agree with your points - and I like the idea of moving to BST+1 (thanks Bert).

    I will point out that in the UK Scouts will be at school at 9am or thereabouts, whereas I believe similarly aged children in the USA might be asked to attend school from 7:30. There's definitely a cultural issue here.

  13. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by scoutgamer View Post
    hello MattR

    I think that time zones and start times for adolescents are one of the many areas where the UK and USA are separated by a common language!

    I agree with your points - and I like the idea of moving to BST+1 (thanks Bert).

    I will point out that in the UK Scouts will be at school at 9am or thereabouts, whereas I believe similarly aged children in the USA might be asked to attend school from 7:30. There's definitely a cultural issue here.
    Think meal times are also very much tied to this. My understanding from american friends is that the evening meal in America is usually eaten at around 5-6pm? Whereas in the UK for adults and teenagers its more likely to be around 7pm. If we went to some european countries that time is more likely to be 8 or 9pm or even later. *

    We've gradually pushed evening meals back a bit at camp... to make the most of daylight for activities. Whereas we used to do an "evening activity" most nights, now we'll quite often do a "cake break" just before they start lighting their fires for dinner, then cook, dinner, wash up, then maybe a brief activity (e.g. planning the next day's hike route, or a short wide game) or maybe straight around the campfire.

    *As an adult in Scouting i've long since lost any semblance of regular meal times... dinner last night was at 11pm at McDonalds after dropping a minibus back to the group we'd borrowed it from. Dinner tonight will be at 5pm before Beavers as rushing straight from Beavers to Scouts.
    Dan Spencer

    Group Scout Leader 66th Bath
    Deputy District Commissioner (Programme) - City of Bath District
    Nights Away Adviser and member of District Executive Committee - City of Bath District
    Member of Avon County Appointments Advisory Committee
    Event organiser "Be Prepared" Resilience Events
    Formerly CSL, SL, ASL and Jamboree Communications Lead

    Web designer


    It is not the mountain we conquer but ourselves

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