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Thread: Stew on an open fire

  1. #1
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    Stew on an open fire

    We are looking at getting our cubs to cook individual stews on an open fire this weekend, but I have a small issue I'm sure many here can answer.

    Most things I've some across say to use a foil bag or something along that sort of line. How do you make such a bag that can take the heat of the fire and make sure all the contents stay inside? I can just see corners starting to burn and stew slowly leaking out.

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    You're looking to make something a bit like a foil Cornish pasty then cover it with several layers of foil and put in the embers (not flames!) Use decent quality foil, not Value.

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    shiftypete (13-02-2019)

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    GSL & AESL shiftypete's Avatar
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    You want a little bit of water in there then it won't get too hot and burn

    I think we succesfully did this with two layers of foil for each packet.

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    Scout Leader (Bosun) Nick's Avatar
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    The corners and edges need folding over several times and pressing down to stop leakages, we only ever use one layer of foil and don't have any problems. Use water with a stock cube in it for a bit of extra flavour and chop everything into small pieces so it cooks quickly - 15 to 20 minutes. If we are including meat we only use beef as that is potentially less harmful than chicken or pork if it is under cooked.

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    Senior Member big chris's Avatar
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    ooo! we've done this!

    double layered foil, some meat and veg and a dash of water, beer, wine whatever.

    So. you lay the foil flat. put another layer on top. Let's say, a3 sized. that might be a bit much .but have a practice.

    Stand so the foil is in portrait mode in front of you. Then fold it upwards so you have a4 sized foil in landascape. The bottom of the bag is the fold.

    Now fold it from the sides to make the pouch and remember to leave space for the veg etc.

    a bit like this: http://3guysoutside.com/2015/07/tin-foil-bags/


    oo... a bit like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAhjIhjWnVI

    this is a really good activity. kids who would turn their nose up at stewed carrots, celery etc will wolf down the stew in a bag

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    shiftypete (14-02-2019)

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    Senior Member Bushfella's Avatar
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    As others have said - double layer the foil.

    Another tip is to lay cabbage leaves on the foil and put the meal inside the cabbage leaves as you wrap it up.

    The cabbage leaf takes the "burn" and adds a litle flavour. You can either eat or discard the cabbage leaf depending upon taste, and or how burnt it gets.
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  10. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushfella View Post
    Another tip is to lay cabbage leaves on the foil and put the meal inside the cabbage leaves as you wrap it up.

    The cabbage leaf takes the "burn" and adds a litle flavour. You can either eat or discard the cabbage leaf depending upon taste, and or how burnt it gets.
    Thinly sliced potato works too.

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    What I do to fold the packets: If you can get heavy duty foil only one layer is needed. A square at least 3 times larger than the food is required. Put the food in the middle. Fold the foil but don't overlap it. Have it meet in the middle pointing upward like an alien space hat. Then, starting at the top where the edges meet, roll the edges together till it comes down to the food (or make a series of small folds). This is what makes a good seal along the top. Next are the sides. Just roll them in. The goal is that you can flip them over without anything leaking. Since every packet will look the same encourage the scouts to use some extra foil or even the extra stuff on the sides to add some way to identify their packet. You end up with lots of geese but they look different.

    Make sure your wood burns down to coals. Straight flame is too hot. Moving them around without tearing them is also a skill.

    Some sort of liquid is important. Can be fat from ground beef, or stock, or wine, or a bit of oil. I learned the hard way that raw rice is a bad idea. It soaks up all the liquid and then allows everything to burn, including the rice! Anyway, there are a lot of great recipes online. Google "foil packet dinners" or "hobo dinners."

    One trick is knowing when it's done. I wish I knew what that was. But listening for sizzling for a certain amount of time is part of it. When you first open the packets to check, be as careful as you can so you can close it back up with a good seal.

    Have fun!

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